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20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the law. >> the founders were very clear on this. the judiciary should be insulated from political pressure. you have the executive, you have the legislative branches, both of them elected. but the judiciary should be insulated. what say you to that? >> what i say to that is that they were meant to be independent to make law or to execute law on their own. and when that happens, the balance of power has to come in, either the legislative branch has to hold them accountable. we have a split legislature. so they couldn't do it. or the governor needs to hold them accountable. the governor won't do it. the opinion has never been executed. so it's the people of iowa who have to hold them accountable. we agree that the judiciary should be free of politics. well don't want them looking over their shoulder except to stay within their constitutional parameters, because god help us all if we allow a court to be independent to make law and execute law, because we call that tyranny, not liberty. and that's what we -- >> there are also those who would argue that the word that you use is activis
a good supreme court justice. after all he's picked a couple and taught constitutional law. he said over and over again for him this is all about what's in a judge's heart. when he nominated sonia sotomayor to the supreme court, president obama laid out his criteria for justices. chief among them empathy. >> it is experience that give a person common sense and touch and compassion and understanding of how the world works and how ordinary people live. and that is why it is a necessary ingredient in the kind of justice we need on the supreme court. >> reporter: it's a trait president obama probably wishes more justices shared when they decided citizens united, the case that largely removed independent corporate spending limits on federal political campaigns. he called out the high court during his 2010 state of the union address. >> with all due deference to separation of powers, last week the supreme court reversed a century of law that i believe will open the flood gates for special interests. >> reporter: four months later the president made sure to highlight similar themes when he nomi
argued before the court thinks he'll do it gradually. >> he's not trying to move the law radically quickly. i think justice scalia or justice thomas really want to get to the end answer as quickly as possible and make the law conform to what they really understand. whereas the chief justice is more incrementalist. >> reporter: but conservative court watcher doesn't believe anything will change any time soon. >> certainly this is not a crusading conservative court. until we have a shift i think in the membership of the court, it's impossible to call it a court that leans more to the left or to the right. >> and, wolf, for those opinions that could be close five-to-four decisions close attention will also be paid to justice kennedy who is frequently the swing vote in some of the toughest cases. >> going to be some very important cases coming up. joe, thanks very, very much. let's dig a bit deeper right now with our senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. his new book entitled "the oath" debuts this week at number five on the "new york times" best seller list. congratulations, jeff. good
is also facing numerous challengeses. the law states the federal government will only recognize traditional marriages, meaning no federal benefits even where same-sex marriage is legal. >> same-sex couples are denied hundreds of different rights and benefits that are provided to married different sex couples under federal law. >> reporter: on the docket as well, whether to curtail parts of the historic voting rights act of 1965. it mandates federal oversight for states with a history of voting discrimination, when changing any rules for elections. challengers say the law is outdated and unnecessary. a big lineup of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. fr frances coe, nbc news. >>> and now here's a look at some other stories making news early today in america. in maine, a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the band of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>>
in federal court if bin laden was captured. the book said he felt dew processs and the rule of law would be the best weapon against al-qaida. >> gretchen: the world's largest generic drug maker pulling the drug antidepressant from a storage shelve. wellbuttrin. it doesn't work like it is supposed to. they found wharf it is. it released. okay it releases faster than the original drug in 2008. federal officials said the two were. now you know why i am not a pharmacist. >> brian: plus you hate the cotton balls. >> gretchen: i do. >> brian: how could a christian bible house not religious. they asked for a exemption of the controversial birth. tyndale house said the ma date violates the beliefs. he said 95 percent of the profits go to non. >> steve: it is the laziest invention ever. the hop and suitcase that follows you around. using the blue tooth signal on your cell phone. fine as long as someone doesn't use yourr cell phone. if it is lost, the bag locks itself and alert the owner's phone. the 28 year old who came up with the idea said it is not ready for the market. >> gretchen: looks like
. >> right. >> the law does make that illegal and, therefore, the workers in each case have to make the determination, are they prepared to break the law. >> but just going back to that graph you showed. a huge reason why lockouts are a higher percentage of strikes, there are almost no strikes anymore. >> exactly. >> there was 19 strikes in 2011 and, you know, 12 and 10 before then. we haven't had more than 20 strikes in companies, more than a thousand people for years and years. in the '80s there were hundreds of strikes. unions are getting less powerful. a lot of lockouts is one of the huge issues with every union is pensions. they're portrayed as a time bomb. they are an onerous cost because of health care and other things. and you lock out workers who have a contract that the owner thinks is paying them too much. it's why companies -- it's kind of -- i love covering sports, but when i have to spend so much time on the nfl and no one ever says anything about the american sugar crystal lockout which is going on over a year and people are not making $150,000 which the part-time ref
. not to apply to college, not to apply to law school, and not to get hired for any job. i was listed in a directory as -- i listed myself as native-american. i was listed there, it's part of who i am. >> do you consider yourself a minority? >> i consider myself as having a native american background. that's what i said, that's what i am. >> no one's questioning what her parents told her when she was younger all the way through that time frame. but when she was asked by the "boston herald," why is harvard touting her as a woman of color, native american, she said she didn't know. and after five weeks of misleading the papers she said i self-reported and she's never answered why she, in fact, did that. >> okay. one notable line came when senator brown was interrupted while trying to explain why he voted against democratic-backed bills. >> she's obviously misat a timing the facts. these were rejection by both democrats and republicans, professor. it wasn't -- if you're going to comment on my record, i would at least have you refer to -- excuse me -- >> is this going to be -- >> go ahead
on stage last night, he said that he doesn't even know that there's such laws that encourage outsourcing. never heard of them. never heard of them. never heard of tax breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas. he said that if it's true, he must need a new accountant. now, we know for sure it was not the real mitt romney because he seems to be doing just fine with his current account. so you see, the man on stage last night, he does not want to be held accountable for the real mitt romney's decisions and what he's been saying for the last year. and that's because he knows full well that we don't want what he's been selling for the last year. >> president obama at that rally in denver earlier today. very, very different from what we saw in the debate last night. watch this. >> the last point i'd make before -- >> two minutes is up, sir. >> i think i had five seconds before you interrupted me was -- the irony is that we've seen this model work really well in massachusetts. >> all right. moments like that may have contributed to what so many people out there see as the president's debate
on a tough new voter identification law that requires everyone to show a picture i.d. at the polls. supporters say they fear election fraud. opponents say it makes it harder for people like young adults and minorities to vote. allison? >>> and on the campaign trail today, tony, the two presidential candidates will leave it up to their running mates to do the talking. as they get ready for tomorrow's big debate. fox's doug luzader has the latest on the president barack obama and mitt romney debate preps. >> reporter: one new national poll is out. but it really hasn't done a whole lot to change the real clear politics, national average of polls, which shows the president nationwide about 3 1/2 points up, over mitt romney. but this all comes down to swing states, including colorado. the site of wednesday's debate. >> mitt romney is already in denver. getting in to the final campaigning and a last-minute endorsement from former broncos quarterback john elway but preparing for a much more critical stage on wednesday. >> so i look forward to these debates. i'm delighted that we will have
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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